Prepping & Survival Articles

Article 2 -Where Is It Safe To Live?
By Brett Creamer

People ask me all the time where is a good place to live in the U.S.A.? As for me, I like the middle of the country (as an example, I live in Indiana).  I am 2-3 hours to Louisville, St. Louis and Indy.  It is hours and hours of flat open farm fields on all sides of me.  Not only is it a perfect location for water, farm fresh foods and hunting, it is far enough away that it is hard to get to if people were reduced to walking.  Trust me, you will not want to have a major influx of people into your community when it hits the fan.  When it does hit the fan, the people in the big cities (like: Philly, NY, Baltimore, DC, LA, San Fran, Miami, Jacksonville, Atlanta) will leave and start to move inward to find food and resources.  It would take them too long to get here on foot and by then, most will have either relocated to a safer spot or will not make it at all.  Imagine if a huge natural disaster happens on the east coast.  I know it takes me 13 hours to drive to Philly…  There is no way those people will be able to get here in a timely matter.  How would the people on the west coast fare?  Much worse.  It would be super hard to walk here over the mountains from LA and get across the rivers.  Now, if the New Madrid Fault goes and we have a mega quake here, at least we have tons of resources for my family and I to live off the land. We are surrounded by lakes, rivers and streams and there is an abudance of farms and woodlands.

Another thought to think about is, are there any nuclear plants near your location? Here is a link to a map I created: Radiation Zones.  The white stripes indicate and area that is, for the most part, safer from downstream winds if the nuclear plants have melt downs. There are only 3 areas in the country that do not have significant nuclear plants in a horizontal plane. I know currents move up and down also, but for the most part the winds blow from west to east. If there are no major nuclear plants to the west of me, chances are, the currents will not blow as much fallout all over me. It's probably a pipe dream, but I want all the odds in my favor if it is a lights out/power down situation that melts all the nuclear plants.

Mountains are a nice option, but it is hard to find a good mountain range devoid of nuclear plants. Also, mountainous areas are harder to grow food in (tree coverage and hard earth) and take longer to traverse if on foot. I've seen storm cells bounce round within mountainous regions for days because the mountains can trap the clouds from moving over them and follow the natural groove in the earth. Also, finding a level camp site and keeping it dry can be a challenge.

 

 


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